Street Outlaws 1

It appears we’re not the only people who watch Street Outlaws on Discovery Channel. Most of us enjoy it because it actually has something to do with cars, but it seems the NHRA isn’t a fan.

We have received news that several participants that either currently have NHRA licenses, or those that have applied for a license, will be denied, or have their license indefinitely suspended for either participating in the show, or inquiring about being on the show. The NHRA says such street racing puts “participants, spectators, the unknowing public, and first responders – at great risk,” according to a document from the NHRA.

slack-imgs.comThe NHRA writes, “The NHRA was founded in 1951 by Wally Parks in an effort to provide an alternative for drag racing enthusiasts who were, at that time, racing illegally on public streets.” That original thought remains one of NHRA’s primary missions, to provide a safe place for people to drag race. The NHRA adds that the show Street Outlaws goes against that premise.

In short, the NHRA stands strongly against any kind of illegal street racing, whether staged, or if two cars happen to be at the same stop light. Not only that; but also the promotion of street racing like what takes place on the show.

The NHRA cites illegal street racing goes against its Section 1.3.1, Participant Conduct within the 2015 NHRA Rulebook. And as mentioned above, one’s NHRA license may be indefinitely suspended if a member is found to be participating in illegal street racing. This is no doubt, a strong stance by the NHRA, but it feels the safest place to drag race is at an NHRA-sanctioned track with the proper safety gear and personnel on hand to handle incidents they’re trained to address.

Show stars Mike Murillo and Jon Andrade Jr. have already confirmed their letters via Facebook.