When it comes to insanely powerful cars, we’re there. Here at powerTV, we like to find the “biggest and baddest” when it comes to the automotive world. Recently, we found out that Virginia Speed was working on yet another impressive project. We couldn’t help but dig a bit further and find out just what kind of powerfully insane car we’re sure to see in the near future.

Our friends over at Virginia Speed are no strangers to the high-performance automotive world. It is one of the top LS engine shops in the country and is constantly busy with LSX projects. Because of their impressive work and reputation, we chose Virginia Speed to build an LSX race engine for us that is currently in progress at their shop.

Recently, Shawn Miller from VA Speed notified us of a customer’s car that they were working on. The car, a ’99 Trans Am owned by Brian Krzewinski, has undergone a couple of different engine builds from VA Speed, and saying they’re impressive would be putting it mildly.

The car originally came to VA Speed as a 12-second, bracket racing car. Krzewinski, just like many gear heads had gotten the itch to go faster and entrusted his car to VA Speed to give him the power that he needed. So, a couple years ago, a 366 CI LS engine was built for him. The engine was based off an LS2 block and had EPT 225 heads as well as a 98mm turbo. Weighing about 3,500 pounds, the car achieved a 7.99 second quarter mile with this set up. But that wasn’t fast enough for long, so VA Speed went back to the drawing board to create an even more powerful set-up.

When asked why the new build was started, Miller stated that Krzewinski “constantly wanted to go faster and wanted to be more competitive.” Krzewinski wanted to qualify higher in the eighth-mile Drag Radial Class at his local track – while the original set-up allowed Krzewinski to qualify for the class, he was always at the back of the pack. A new, more powerful set-up was in order.

Using an RHS block, VA Speed built a 427 CI LS engine with GRP rods, JE pistons, Sonny Bryant billet crank, Jesel rockers and ETP 265 heads for the car. A 106mm Precision billet turbo was also fitted to the engine. This set-up produces about 2,200 horsepower. With the car lightened to 3,250 pounds, the car was predicted to have no problem running low 7’s in the quarter mile.

The car was taken out to the track for the first time with the new engine to see what it could do in late March. Unfortunately, an ECU failure led to engine damage, and no clean pass was achieved.

So what now? Well, currently the engine is being rebuilt again at VA Speed. Although the ECU failure was no one’s fault, VA Speed and RHS are helping Krzewinski out so that he’s able to get another extensive engine build without getting clobbered in the wallet. The engine will have the same components and configurations as it did before it blew at the track. Miller expressed his sadness about the initial rebuild getting damaged at the track, stating “I put my heart and soul into all the engines we build and when one breaks, it’s like my child getting hurt.”

The engine is set to be finished in a couple of weeks, and it is then that the car can go out to the track to prove what it’s made of. “We expect 7.20’s at 200 MPH,” Miller said. When we asked what Miller thought about the engine build, he said that Krzewinski “has all the right pieces to be right their in the hunt.” He added that the car has “a lot of potential.”

We can’t wait for this engine build to be done so that this beast of a car can make its presence at the track known once again. Best of luck goes out to Krzewinski and VA Speed to break personal records with this build. We look forward to finding out just how well it does when it makes its come-back soon.